Contact Tonometer

Contact tonometry is similar to non-contact tonometry with the obvious difference- contact tonometry comes in direct contact with the eye.

In developing countries, contact tonometry poses a greater cultural issue. Dilation and numbing drops are not highly accepted, which turns people away from wanting to get tested for glaucoma. As discussed in the last post, glaucoma undiagnosed will cause irreversible blindness.

Like non-contact tonometers, contact tonometers are very expensive. Most are sold for close to $4,000. Non-portable ones are even more expensive.

So at this point you might be wondering, why would anyone need a contact tonometer over a non-contact tonometer? The largest draw to a contact tonometer is the accuracy. Non-contact tonometers are not nearly as accurate as contact ones.

Cornea
Cornea
Pressure applied by a contact tonometer
Pressure applied by a contact tonometer

Contact tonometers measure IOP by applying direct pressure onto the cornea. In order to come in direct contact with the eye dilation and numbing is required. This is not desirable in developing countries, but it is necessary for a contact tonometer to measure the IOP. Most tonometers are calibrated to measure in millimeters of Mercury (mmHg).

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One Small Step for Man, One Giant Leap for Mankind

Clarity Design is very enthusiastic about the opportunity to utilize our design and manufacturing services for a humanitarian purpose. With the goal of helping others, especially those in developing countries, we have teamed up with the Himalayan Cataract Project to help eradicate curable and preventable blindness.

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First, let’s dig into some background information on this life-changing organization and the people behind it.

The goal of the Himalayan Cataract Project, in short, is to provide affordable, high-quality, sustainable eye care to the developing world. The HCP has built infrastructures and eye care facilities, trained and educated local eye care teams, and performed countless surgeries to bring sight back to people all over the world. In 2013 alone, the HCP helped over 670,000 patients and performed 60,017 surgeries.

For the majority of people in the developing world, sight is survival. In Kalimpong, India a woman's sight is restored with the help of the HCP.
For the majority of people in the developing world, sight is survival. In Kalimpong, India, a woman’s sight is restored with the help of the HCP.

The Himalayan Cataract Project was started by two ophthalmologists with a mission- a mission to cure blindness.

Dr. Sanduk Ruit and Dr. Geoff Tabin await results at a rural eye camp.
Dr. Sanduk Ruit (left) and Dr. Geoff Tabin (right) at a rural eye camp. They are able to perform a cataract surgery replacing a lens in 7 minutes for $20.

Dr. Ruit (left) educating others on his cataract surgery techniques.
Dr. Ruit (left) educating others on his cataract surgery techniques.

Dr. Sanduk Ruit, Co-Founder of HCP, was the first Nepali doctor to perform cataract surgery with intraocular lens implants. He also pioneered a method for delivering high-quality microsurgical procedures in remote places. His work has not gone unrecognized as he has received some of the highest attainable awards in the area of international health.

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Dr. Geoff Tabin, Co-Founder of HCP, is a Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences as well as the Director of International Ophthalmology at the John A. Moran Eye Center. He dedicates a significant amount of time working in Nepal and throughout the Himalayas.

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"My partner Dr. Sanduk Ruit and I have vowed to work to eliminate all preventable and treatable blindness from the Himalayan region in our lifetime, a goal more audacious than setting out to make the first assent of the East Face of Mount Everest.” -Dr. Geoff Tabin
“My partner Dr. Sanduk Ruit and I have vowed to work to eliminate all preventable and treatable blindness from the Himalayan region in our lifetime, a goal more audacious than setting out to make the first assent of the East Face of Mount Everest.” -Dr. Geoff Tabin

To learn more about this amazing organization and how you can be a part of the movement to cure blindness go to the Himalayan Cataract Project website.

To find out how Clarity Design is involved with the HCP and what we are doing to help cure blindness, keep checking back for more posts. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter (@ClarityDesign_) for more information.